Posts tagged Internet

THIS DAY IN INTERNET HISTORY: On this day in 2005, YouTube was launched. Before this, nobody gave a crap about your stupid cat…

THIS DAY IN INTERNET HISTORY: On this day in 2005, YouTube was launched. Before this, nobody gave a crap about your stupid cat…

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HOW TO BE A SOCIAL MEDIA EXPERT: 1 ) Follow at least 20,000 people; 2.)  Live at home with your parents; and 3.) Be an assclown…

CISPA Is the New SOPA
CISPA is the new SOPA. Today marks the opening of a week of action in opposition to the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act, which would obliterate any semblance of online privacy in the United States. It’s up for a vote later this month.



CISPA demolishes existing barriers between the government and the private sector — and between government agencies, including the military — that restrict casual data sharing. It would effectively allow information about Americans’ use of the Internet to slosh back and forth uninhibited.



The Center for Democracy and Technology says, “CISPA has a very broad, almost unlimited definition of the information that can be shared with government agencies and it supersedes all other privacy laws.”



Corporations like Facebook could share information about their users with other corporations and the government, so long as it’s justified by a concern fitting the overly broad conception of cybersecurity threats: alleged piracy or the “degradation’ of a company’s network, for instance. That data could then be used towards nearly any end, from surveillance to hocking products to Internet users.



And according to the Electronic Frontier Foundation, CISPA would accomplish much of the job that Hollywood and other content owners couldn’t get done off via SOPA earlier this year:
An ISP could even interpret this bill as allowing them to block accounts believed to be infringing, block access to websites like The Pirate Bay believed to carry infringing content, or take other measures provided they claimed it was motivated by cybersecurity concerns.
You can join nearly 90,000 other Internet users by using Demand Progress’s action page to urge your lawmakers to oppose CISPA.
Does Facebook really care about Internet users’ rights?
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CISPA represents the first notable rift within the coalition of organizations and businesses that helped lead the charge against Stop Online Piracy Act. SOPA’s opponents came together in a kumbaya moment, with almost anybody who cares about the Internet — as user, activist, or profiteer — lining up against the bill.



Facebook struck an aggressive posture in opposition to SOPA, and at the time Mark Zuckerberg asserted:
The internet is the most powerful tool we have for creating a more open and connected world. We can’t let poorly thought out laws get in the way of the internet’s development. Facebook opposes SOPA and PIPA, and we will continue to oppose any laws that will hurt the internet.
He was right, but it wasn’t hard for Facebook to oppose SOPA: Its passage would have hurt Facebook’s bottom line — and probably forced it to alter basic business practices — by forcing it to aggressively to police alleged piracy.



And now the profit motive is causing Facebook to support CISPA, at the expense of its users, because it would relieve certain regulatory burdens and provide attractive immunities for the company.



Internet users were able to push GoDaddy to withdraw its support of SOPA. Now it’s time to make sure Facebook knows we’re furious:



Over the last few days more than 150,000 people have signed Demand Progress’s open letter to Facebook, and called Mark Zuckerberg out on his hypocrisy — please join them by clicking here.



Courtesy of  David Segal RI State Representative, Former Congressional Candidate, Demand Progress Exec Director for The Huffington Post

CISPA Is the New SOPA

CISPA is the new SOPA. Today marks the opening of a week of action in opposition to the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act, which would obliterate any semblance of online privacy in the United States. It’s up for a vote later this month.

CISPA demolishes existing barriers between the government and the private sector — and between government agencies, including the military — that restrict casual data sharing. It would effectively allow information about Americans’ use of the Internet to slosh back and forth uninhibited.

The Center for Democracy and Technology says, “CISPA has a very broad, almost unlimited definition of the information that can be shared with government agencies and it supersedes all other privacy laws.”

Corporations like Facebook could share information about their users with other corporations and the government, so long as it’s justified by a concern fitting the overly broad conception of cybersecurity threats: alleged piracy or the “degradation’ of a company’s network, for instance. That data could then be used towards nearly any end, from surveillance to hocking products to Internet users.

And according to the Electronic Frontier Foundation, CISPA would accomplish much of the job that Hollywood and other content owners couldn’t get done off via SOPA earlier this year:

An ISP could even interpret this bill as allowing them to block accounts believed to be infringing, block access to websites like The Pirate Bay believed to carry infringing content, or take other measures provided they claimed it was motivated by cybersecurity concerns.

You can join nearly 90,000 other Internet users by using Demand Progress’s action page to urge your lawmakers to oppose CISPA.


Does Facebook really care about Internet users’ rights?

.

CISPA represents the first notable rift within the coalition of organizations and businesses that helped lead the charge against Stop Online Piracy Act. SOPA’s opponents came together in a kumbaya moment, with almost anybody who cares about the Internet — as user, activist, or profiteer — lining up against the bill.

Facebook struck an aggressive posture in opposition to SOPA, and at the time Mark Zuckerberg asserted:

The internet is the most powerful tool we have for creating a more open and connected world. We can’t let poorly thought out laws get in the way of the internet’s development. Facebook opposes SOPA and PIPA, and we will continue to oppose any laws that will hurt the internet.

He was right, but it wasn’t hard for Facebook to oppose SOPA: Its passage would have hurt Facebook’s bottom line — and probably forced it to alter basic business practices — by forcing it to aggressively to police alleged piracy.

And now the profit motive is causing Facebook to support CISPA, at the expense of its users, because it would relieve certain regulatory burdens and provide attractive immunities for the company.

Internet users were able to push GoDaddy to withdraw its support of SOPA. Now it’s time to make sure Facebook knows we’re furious:

Over the last few days more than 150,000 people have signed Demand Progress’s open letter to Facebook, and called Mark Zuckerberg out on his hypocrisy — please join them by clicking here.

Courtesy of   RI State Representative, Former Congressional Candidate, Demand Progress Exec Director for The Huffington Post

7 notes 

The Bad Business Idea Of The Week…



The service, called Shitter, will take one or more feeds from your Twitter account and print those tweets on toilet paper you can then display and use proudly in your favorite restroom.



The company’s tagline: “Social Media has never been so disposable.”



Shitter allows you to have a roll printed with your own personal tweets, your timeline, favorites, or tweets from a specific list you’ve created or follow on Twitter. If there’s someone on Twitter you think has particularly crappy things to say, you can opt to have his or her feed printed on a few rolls.



Priced for use in high-end powder rooms, Shitter rolls are priced at $35 for a pack of four. That, you may reasonably surmise, is money down the drain. 



So, do the math, and if Shitter’s rolls of TP have the standard 75 sheets you’d be shelling out about 8.5 cents a sheet to drop your latest tweets off at the pool.




Courtesy of Emily Price

The Bad Business Idea Of The Week…

The service, called Shitter, will take one or more feeds from your Twitter account and print those tweets on toilet paper you can then display and use proudly in your favorite restroom.

The company’s tagline: “Social Media has never been so disposable.”

Shitter allows you to have a roll printed with your own personal tweets, your timeline, favorites, or tweets from a specific list you’ve created or follow on Twitter. If there’s someone on Twitter you think has particularly crappy things to say, you can opt to have his or her feed printed on a few rolls.

Priced for use in high-end powder rooms, Shitter rolls are priced at $35 for a pack of four. That, you may reasonably surmise, is money down the drain. 

So, do the math, and if Shitter’s rolls of TP have the standard 75 sheets you’d be shelling out about 8.5 cents a sheet to drop your latest tweets off at the pool.

Courtesy of 

                   FaceBook Is Not Your Friend
          This Week’s Reason To Unfriend FaceBook
Facebook’s Terms Of Service are completely one-sided. Let’s just begin with the very basics. Facebook’s Terms Of Service state that not only do they own your data (section 2.1), but if you don’t keep it up to date and accurate (section 4.6), they can terminate your account (section 14). Facebook might try to argue that these terms are just protecting Facebook’s interests, and are not usually in practice, enforced, but in the context of their many other activities, such a defense is pretty weak. Simply put, there’s no good reason whatsoever to give them the benefit of the doubt. Essentially, Facebook sees their customers (meaning you) as unpaid employees for crowd-sourcing ad-targeting data.



Since Facebook’s CEO has a documented history of unethical behavior, there’s no reason to trust that Facebook will do the right thing when it comes to your personal information. From the very beginning of Facebook’s existence, there have been numerous questions about Zuckerberg’s ethics. According to BusinessInsider.com, Zuckerberg used Facebook user data to guess email passwords and read personal email in order to discredit his rivals. These allegations, albeit unproven and somewhat dated, nonetheless raise disturbing questions about the ethics of the CEO of the world’s largest social network. They’re particularly compelling given that Facebook chose to fork over $65M to settle a related lawsuit alleging that Zuckerberg had actually stolen the idea for Facebook itself.



As a matter of fact, Facebook has flat out declared war on privacy.  Mark Zuckerberg, in defense of Facebook’s privacy changes last January stated;

 ”People have really gotten comfortable not only sharing more information and different kinds, but more openly and with more people. That social norm is just something that has evolved over time.” More recently, in introducing the Open Graph API: “… the default is now social.”

Essentially, this means Facebook not only wants to know everything about you, and own that data, but to make it available to everybody. Which would not, by itself, necessarily be unethical, except that Facebook can’t be trusted in the first place…

                   FaceBook Is Not Your Friend

          This Week’s Reason To Unfriend FaceBook

Facebook’s Terms Of Service are completely one-sided. Let’s just begin with the very basics. Facebook’s Terms Of Service state that not only do they own your data (section 2.1), but if you don’t keep it up to date and accurate (section 4.6), they can terminate your account (section 14). Facebook might try to argue that these terms are just protecting Facebook’s interests, and are not usually in practice, enforced, but in the context of their many other activities, such a defense is pretty weak. Simply put, there’s no good reason whatsoever to give them the benefit of the doubt. Essentially, Facebook sees their customers (meaning you) as unpaid employees for crowd-sourcing ad-targeting data.

Since Facebook’s CEO has a documented history of unethical behavior, there’s no reason to trust that Facebook will do the right thing when it comes to your personal information. From the very beginning of Facebook’s existence, there have been numerous questions about Zuckerberg’s ethics. According to BusinessInsider.com, Zuckerberg used Facebook user data to guess email passwords and read personal email in order to discredit his rivals. These allegations, albeit unproven and somewhat dated, nonetheless raise disturbing questions about the ethics of the CEO of the world’s largest social network. They’re particularly compelling given that Facebook chose to fork over $65M to settle a related lawsuit alleging that Zuckerberg had actually stolen the idea for Facebook itself.

As a matter of fact, Facebook has flat out declared war on privacy.  Mark Zuckerberg, in defense of Facebook’s privacy changes last January stated;

 ”People have really gotten comfortable not only sharing more information and different kinds, but more openly and with more people. That social norm is just something that has evolved over time.” More recently, in introducing the Open Graph API: “… the default is now social.”

Essentially, this means Facebook not only wants to know everything about you, and own that data, but to make it available to everybody. Which would not, by itself, necessarily be unethical, except that Facebook can’t be trusted in the first place…

7 notes 

How To Make Facebook Friends In The Real World…

You are a student at Arizona State University…

You have 3 actual “real life” friends who tell you that you have the social skills of a South American Tree Sloth…And yet, according to Facebook, the world’s largest social network, you are a superstar with 5,000 Facebook friends….

You spend your days studying physics and alternate your evenings playing World of Warcraft (you are a level 80 Night Elf Druid) and posting photos of your pet gecko “Bilbo”, while randomly poking your small army of Facebook friends. (which is just too much poking really…)

Of course, you lead a completely normal, well-adjusted life…..

Until, you are invited to an “Event” in Downtown Tempe by one of your Facebook friends who invites people to events like a hyperactive spider monkey on Ritalin…

Friday night.  9pm.  Mill Avenue.  

You are standing in the middle of a crowded bar with a very large pink fizzy glass full of an unknown mixture of alcohol, crushed ice and food coloring…

You fail to comprehend why Tuesday would be considered fatter than any other day…

You spy a pretty blonde girl at the end of the bar.  You approach and ask her if you were to “poke” her, would she reciprocate in kind and “poke” you too?

You are lying spread eagle on the floor of the bar.  There is pink fizzy goo all over your brand new Star Wars T-Shirt.  You feel the side of your face where there is a large red welt…

Remembering that “you only get a once in a lifetime opportunity so many times”, you make your way back over to the same pretty blonde girl and ask her if she would like to check out your “post”.  You tell her that everyone likes your “post”, and you are sure that she will enjoy it too…

You are flying…flying into the cold night air…

The last thing that you see before landing onto an old homeless guy panhandling outside the bar on the sidewalk is the angry face of an extremely large man.

That angry face belongs to a man who is a bouncer and who curiously resembles a level 68 Goblin Warlock…

You wonder if the pretty blonde girl will ever comment on your “post”…

The homeless guy has a dog.  It chews on your ankle. 

As you walk down Mill Avenue, you see a short haired girl dressed in overalls. She looks just like a farm-girl.  So, you ask her if she’d like to help you harvest your virtual corn.  Or, you tell her, that you have a great pickle patch, if pickles are the type of tuber that she likes to pick.

You don’t understand how this girl expects you to “get lost” when you have Google Maps.  So, you tell her that you’ll just follow her. In fact, you tell her that you are really quite good at following.  You like to follow people. Following people is fun. You decide that you are definitely going to follow her…

Two very large and unpleasant Policemen escort you to a private jail cell…

Apparently, there are certain people who interpret excessive following behavior as “stalking”…

You do not want to poke or follow anyone here…

You decide to check in with FourSquare and discover that you are the “Mayor”…

You are the Mayor of the Tempe City Jail…

That is almost as cool as Farmville…

lol…

#MCO435

3 notes 

Crime And Punishment: Getting Arrested On Facebook…

Facebook wall posts, photos, messages, events pages and more can be helpful tools for authorities tracking a suspect, serving as key evidence in criminal cases. Recently, it’s become more and more common for police to turn to the social network during investigations.

In December 2010, a former New York EMT, Mark Musarella, pleaded guilty to charges of misconduct and disorderly conduct, according to the AP. “Prosecutors say Musarella responded to a March 30, 2009, emergency call in Staten Island, where he snapped a picture of a woman who had been strangled. He then posted the image on [Facebook], the AP also writes.



In July 2011, Joseph Bernard Campbell said he would plead guilty to charges of cyberstalking and unauthorized access to a computer. “At least 19 women were victimized by a computer hacker who broke into their email accounts, captured risqué photographs of the women and then swapped them for the women’s Facebook profile pictures, authorities say,” reports Tampa Bay Online. 



In Carson City, Nevada a group of six girls (ages 12 to 13) were arrested in January 2011 for allegedly posting threatening comments on the wall of a Facebook event titled “Attack A Teacher Day.” According to the Nevada Appeal, posts apparently written by the girls containted the word “attack.”  ”All of the girls said it was just a joke,” Carson City Sheriff’s Deputy Jessica Rivera told the Appeal.



In April 2011, two preteen girls from a Seattle suburb were charged with cyberstalking and first-degree computer trespassing. Reuters reports that the girls “allegedly post[ed] sexually explicit photos and comments on the Facebook page of a 12-year-old classmate” and were “accused of using the third girl’s computer address to send out instant message solicitations for sex using her name.”



London Eley of Philadelphia allegedly used Facebook to find and hire someone to kill Corey White, the father of her child. “I will pay somebody a stack to kill my baby father,” Eley wrote, according 6ABC.com. A man named Timothy Bynum allegedly accepted Eley’s offer, writing, “say no more,” “what he look like?” and “need dat stack 1st,” reports 6ABC.com. White alerted the authorities to the alleged correspondence between Eley and Bynum, both of whom were taken into custody in June 2011.  White was shot in August while Eley and Bynum remained in jail.



An Illinois teenager was arrested in May 2011 for allegedly distributing (via Facebook) a provocative list that ranked the physical appearance of 50 girls from his high school. According to the Chicago Sun Times, the list in question “described the girls by explicit, derogatory nicknames and assessed their physical appearance, sexual desirability, sexual activity and other characteristics”. The Associated Press lists nicknames like “Fallen Angel,” “Blond Bombshell” and “The Hangover.” ”He obviously offended people but he also has a right to free speech,” criminal defense attorney Mark Gottesman told The Huffington Post.



Former U.S. Congress candidate Cheryl Allen was arrested and charged in January 2011 for reportedly threatening several civil servants. According to the Associated Press, ”The alleged threats mentioned four Morgan County judges, and other public officials […] were mentioned by first name. Media reports said Allen had previously filed a discrimination lawsuit that was dismissed by a judge.”



In February 2011, Eric James Wilson, 21, was arrested in Palm Bay, Florida forallegedly assaulting his then-wife. According to ZDNET, police charged Wilson with “battery domestic violence and a misdemeanor.” The fight reportedly started after Wilson changed his Facebook relationship status from “married” to “single.”



#MCO435

Crime And Punishment: Getting Arrested On Facebook…

Facebook wall posts, photos, messages, events pages and more can be helpful tools for authorities tracking a suspect, serving as key evidence in criminal cases. Recently, it’s become more and more common for police to turn to the social network during investigations.

In December 2010, a former New York EMT, Mark Musarella, pleaded guilty to charges of misconduct and disorderly conduct, according to the AP. “Prosecutors say Musarella responded to a March 30, 2009, emergency call in Staten Island, where he snapped a picture of a woman who had been strangled. He then posted the image on [Facebook], the AP also writes.

In July 2011, Joseph Bernard Campbell said he would plead guilty to charges of cyberstalking and unauthorized access to a computer. “At least 19 women were victimized by a computer hacker who broke into their email accounts, captured risqué photographs of the women and then swapped them for the women’s Facebook profile pictures, authorities say,” reports Tampa Bay Online

In Carson City, Nevada a group of six girls (ages 12 to 13) were arrested in January 2011 for allegedly posting threatening comments on the wall of a Facebook event titled “Attack A Teacher Day.” According to the Nevada Appeal, posts apparently written by the girls containted the word “attack.”  ”All of the girls said it was just a joke,” Carson City Sheriff’s Deputy Jessica Rivera told the Appeal.

In April 2011, two preteen girls from a Seattle suburb were charged with cyberstalking and first-degree computer trespassing. Reuters reports that the girls “allegedly post[ed] sexually explicit photos and comments on the Facebook page of a 12-year-old classmate” and were “accused of using the third girl’s computer address to send out instant message solicitations for sex using her name.”

London Eley of Philadelphia allegedly used Facebook to find and hire someone to kill Corey White, the father of her child. “I will pay somebody a stack to kill my baby father,” Eley wrote, according 6ABC.com. A man named Timothy Bynum allegedly accepted Eley’s offer, writing, “say no more,” “what he look like?” and “need dat stack 1st,” reports 6ABC.com. White alerted the authorities to the alleged correspondence between Eley and Bynum, both of whom were taken into custody in June 2011.  White was shot in August while Eley and Bynum remained in jail.

An Illinois teenager was arrested in May 2011 for allegedly distributing (via Facebook) a provocative list that ranked the physical appearance of 50 girls from his high school. According to the Chicago Sun Times, the list in question “described the girls by explicit, derogatory nicknames and assessed their physical appearance, sexual desirability, sexual activity and other characteristics”. The Associated Press lists nicknames like “Fallen Angel,” “Blond Bombshell” and “The Hangover.” ”He obviously offended people but he also has a right to free speech,” criminal defense attorney Mark Gottesman told The Huffington Post.

Former U.S. Congress candidate Cheryl Allen was arrested and charged in January 2011 for reportedly threatening several civil servants. According to the Associated Press, ”The alleged threats mentioned four Morgan County judges, and other public officials […] were mentioned by first name. Media reports said Allen had previously filed a discrimination lawsuit that was dismissed by a judge.”

In February 2011, Eric James Wilson, 21, was arrested in Palm Bay, Florida forallegedly assaulting his then-wifeAccording to ZDNET, police charged Wilson with “battery domestic violence and a misdemeanor.” The fight reportedly started after Wilson changed his Facebook relationship status from “married” to “single.”

#MCO435

1 note 

February 9, 2012:

The recent actions by the ASU administration to block access to the Change.org tuition petition are despicable. Worse, the University’s justification for these actions was a bold-faced lie.

For the University to block an online petition just because it advocates something they may not like is the height of institutional censorship, which is contrary to the most deeply held virtues of the academy.

Does AT&T disconnect your phone call if you’re telling a friend that their service is overpriced? Does your MacBook stop working if you go to download a Linux distribution? Of course not.

Worse, far worse, is ASU’s claim that they blocked access to this website to conserve their network resources. This is a lie, plain and simple. They know it, and they purposefully lied to the University community anyway. This website uses a miniscule amount of bandwidth. Students and faculty transfer tens of gigabytes of data without thinking twice, or stream multi-GB movies from Netflix. Compared to these everyday “acceptable” uses of the network, the amount of bandwidth consumed by Change.org‘s petition is utterly trivial — maybe a few hundred kilobytes. This has nothing to do with the cost of tuition at ASU. It’s about censorship and about using lies to justify it.

Sun Devils, you deserve better. You deserve for your university to foster open discourse, something that has been cherished by academics for a thousand years, and not censor ideas just because they’re afraid of them. You also deserve for your university, to whom you each pay thousands of dollars a year, to not lie to your faces about what they’re doing and why.

Walter Freeman
Ph.D., Computational Physics

Originally published February 8, 2012 at 5:18 pm at statepress.com

7 notes 

Stop Paying Facebook’s Taxes…
According to Citizens for Tax Justice’s new report, Facebook’s raking in many extra millions because of tax loopholes that let them pay nothing.



Through a ridiculous corporate loophole, Facebook could avoid paying income taxes for an entire generation. In 2012 alone, the social network is poised to receive a $0.5 billion government refund instead of paying its fair share.Enough is enough. These unfair corporate tax loopholes need to come to an end, and there’s something we can do about them right now. This news about Facebook is a chance to get lots of Americans fired up about meaningful corporate tax reform.



 

Stop Paying Facebook’s Taxes…

According to Citizens for Tax Justice’s new report, Facebook’s raking in many extra millions because of tax loopholes that let them pay nothing.

Through a ridiculous corporate loophole, Facebook could avoid paying income taxes for an entire generation. In 2012 alone, the social network is poised to receive a $0.5 billion government refund instead of paying its fair share.

Enough is enough. These unfair corporate tax loopholes need to come to an end, and there’s something we can do about them right now. This news about Facebook is a chance to get lots of Americans fired up about meaningful corporate tax reform.

 

Arizona State University might need to change its name to Censorship U after deciding to block students’ access to popular petition site Change.org.

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Change.org happens to be hosting a petition created by ASU student Eric Haywood that protests rising tuition costs at the school.

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This blocking could be violating the First Amendment rights of ASU students to speak freely and petition government.

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When challenged about the website blocking, ASU officials claimed that Change.org is a spam site, writing that the blocking was conducted “to protect the use of our limited and valuable network resources for legitimate academic, research and administrative uses.”

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But Change.org is anything but spam. It’s a perfectly lawful website that has helped millions take action on a host of important issues (disclaimer: I worked there as managing editor from 2008-2009).

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The fact is, disabling access to any lawful site violates the spirit and principles of Net Neutrality, chills academic freedom and possibly rises to the level of a First Amendment violation. It’s astonishing that ASU President Michael M. Crow would allow this to happen — and that’s why Free Press and Change.org are urging him to stop his school’s censorship immediately.

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We’re at a moment when threats to online speech are peeking around every corner. Just last month, we beat back SOPA and PIPA, two bills in Congress that would have opened the door to online censorship from big corporations.

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Now Arizona State University is going after free speech. If it gets away with this, other universities could be emboldened to follow suit. We must defend ASU students’ right to speak online.

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1 note 

On December 1, 2011 a group of ASU students started the petition titled "Arizona State University: Reduce The Costs Of Education For Arizona State University Students." at the Change.org petition site.

This petition requested signatures to support the reduction in the cost of education for ASU students.

On the morning of December 7, 2011, Arizona State University BLOCKED ALL ACCESS to Change.org for ALL of it’s over 70,000 students and over 5,000 faculty and employees. 

As of this date, approximately TWO MONTHS later, Arizona State University continues it’s BLOCKADE of the Change.org petition website, in a blatant attempt to prevent it’s current ernollment of more than 70,000 students from viewing and/or signing the petition to reduce college costs.



Clearly, ASU does not want it’s students, faculty, or employees signing this petition and has resorted to BLATANT and UNLAWFUL Censorship in order to block the freedom of expression of it’s students and faculty.

As such, students living on ASU campus, using ASU computers or accessing the internet through ASU’s school WIFI are unable to access Change.org. 

As a result, Not only can’t ASU students sign the above petition but they are unable to sign ANY PETITION on the Change.org website.

In addition, emails sent from any “change.org” email address to any student or faculty email address ending in “asu.edu” are also being blocked by Arizona State University. That means that ASU refuses to allow Change.org or anyone using Change.org to send Arizona State University students or faculty emails regarding petitions facilitated by Change.org.

Not only is this outrageous, but it is a violation of the 1st Amendment rights of both ASU students as well the rights of Change.org and those with petitions hosted by Change.org to freely express itself.




Last time I checked this was America, not China, or Iran, or North Korea…..

What can be done about this?

Well. If you are an ASU Student, Professor, Instructor, or Employee you CAN sign the petition….You just can’t use any ASU computer or WIFI network to do so….

Just go to the  petition at the Change.org site from your computer using ANY WIFI connection that is NOT associated with ASU…..That’s it…..Easy.

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Support Arizona State University Students.

Support Freedom Of Expression.

Support The 99%.

Sign The Petition.

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http://www.change.org/petitions/arizona-state-board-of-regents-reduce-the-costs-of-education-for-arizona-state-university-students

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